Posts Tagged ‘Oregon’

Camping World is celebrating the grand opening of its new Jacksonville location, officially named Camping World of Jacksonville.

Formerly Suncoast RV, Camping World of Jacksonville encompasses both a Camping World retail store and Camping World RV Sales dealership. It is located at 9012 Beach Blvd.

The grand-opening celebration, which began with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Nov. 4, runs through next Sunday. Customers will find a good selection of hundreds of new and pre-owned RVs. In addition, there are daily camping accessory and parts specials, plus free door prizes to the first 50 customers each day and free coloring books for children. There will also be free lunch on Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. during the grand-opening event.

“With its abundance of outdoor recreational activities and natural attractions, Jacksonville is an ideal location for Camping World,” said Camping World of Jacksonville General Manager of RV Sales Matt Bateh. “We look forward to continue serving the Florida, Southern Georgia and Jacksonville areas.

“This store – along with our new Birmingham store – is the first step to reaching 100 stores by 2014. We believe that the Greater Jacksonville market needed a full-service solution for RVers,” said Marcus Lemonis, Camping World’s chairman and CEO.

Camping World is the world’s largest retailer of recreational vehicles and provides outdoor enthusiasts more than 8,000 RV parts and accessories, service and collision centers along with other products and services to enhance the RV and outdoor lifestyle.

Today, the Lincolnshire, Ill.-based company serves more than 4 million RV enthusiasts with more than 81 RV lifestyle retail locations.

Camping World provides retail sale, finance, service and rental of recreational vehicles, with more than $300 million of new and used recreational vehicle inventory representing more than 13 RV manufacturers and 150 brand names.

In addition, Camping World currently operates in 33 states, including Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington and Wisconsin.

For more information on Camping World of Jacksonville, call 1-877-508-5417 or go to campingworldofjacksonville.com.

Violent windstorms in March knocked down nearly 150 trees, leaving picnic tables snapped in half, logs blocking service roads and debris scattered around four of Oregon’s Middle Fork Ranger District popular campgrounds. Because of safety concerns, the four campgrounds, which typically open by early May, will be closed at least until Memorial Day weekend in late May.

The affected campgrounds are Black Canyon near Westfir on Highway 58, and Broken Bowl, Bedrock and Puma, all east of Fall Creek Lake off Forest Service Road 18.

The closures include access to bathrooms, boat ramps and camping sites. Every effort is being made to open these campgrounds by Memorial Day weekend.

“Safety of the public is our first concern,” Forest Service spokeswoman Katie Isacksen said. “We realize these are highly popular areas for camping, but we need people to understand there are just too many hazards at this point.”

Isacksen said crews have begun surveying the damage and are expected to remove trees in the affected campgrounds in the next week or two. Crews have already started removing trees blocking roadways, she said.

Rangers are suggesting that campers don’t abandon the area this spring but instead consider other campgrounds that weren’t affected by the March storms, including Dolly Varden and Big Pool east of Fall Creek Lake.

To clean up the affected campgrounds, and to pay for the damages and the cleanup crews, the district will conduct two salvage sales where interested parties can buy fallen timber. Isacksen estimated that more than 200,000 board feet will be available.

Firewood permits for the salvage areas will not be issued until after the campgrounds are restored. Residents looking for firewood are advised to call the Middle Fork Ranger District for more information; interested campers can check the status and cleanup process at the Willamette National Forest website.

 

The next time you’re planning a camping trip, the states of Washington, Idaho, and Oregon want you to think about protecting your favorite outdoor haunts by not moving firewood. The Buy It Where You Burn It campaign encourages people to obtain their firewood in a place as close as possible to the place where it will be burned.

Firewood is a high-risk vector for wood-boring insects such as emerald ash borer and Asian longhorned beetle, two species responsible for widespread defoliation of forests in Midwest and Eastern states. Washington, Oregon, and Idaho teamed up to spread the word about the potential dangers of transporting firewood carrying live invasive insects and diseases using grant funding from the 2010 Farm Bill. The campaign launched in full force July 15.

The tri-state $481,000 campaign includes billboards and radio spots, firewood exchange programs, biodegradable flying discs and playing cards with “Don’t Move Firewood” messages, and pre- and post-awareness surveys conducted by Oregon State University to determine the effectiveness of outreach.

The Oregon Invasive Species Council (OISC) led the development of a grant to launch an outreach and education campaign with Washington and Idaho to inform the public about the many insect and fungal invasive species and diseases that can be spread by moving untreated firewood.

“Just about anyone that goes camping or spends time outdoors enjoys a campfire,” said OISC Chair Sam Chan. “But we need the public’s ass istance to buy and burn firewood locally, not transport firewood beyond local distances, or use heat-treated firewood. Otherwise, the potential exists to introduce species like the emerald ash borer and wood boring insects that have decimated forests in the Eastern United States and threaten millions of forested acres in the West. We recognize that invasive species don’t acknowledge state lines, therefore, we asked Idaho and Washington to partner with us in this campaign to protect the Pacific Northwest.”

People have traditionally moved firewood to favorite camp spots and even new homes without recognizing the threat posed by firewood as a pathway for the movement of invasive species.

What are individual states doing to lessen the threat caused by insects and diseases in firewood? Some states have placed restrictions on out-of-state firewood unless it has been heat treated, while other states discourage people from moving firewood within the state — buy local and burn local. Outreach programs have been launched in most states, and a national website, www.dontmovefirewood.org/, provides excellent information on not moving firewood.

“Hopefully, when people plan their next trip, whether it be camping, hunting, fishing, or moving their residence, they’ll make the right choice for Oregon and leave their firewood behind, and then buy and burn local or heat-treated firewood,” said Chan. “This is one invasive species issue where literally everyone can make a difference.”

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